The Czech Republic is getting a new name: Czechia

The Czech Republic is getting a new name: Czechia

Politicians in the Czech Republic are set to put decades of debate to an end this week by officially announcing a new name for the country: Czechia.

In a meeting with reporters this week, Foreign Minister Lubomir Zaoralek said he supported the move, suggesting that foreigners often mangled his country’s name when he met them abroad. “It is not good if a country does not have clearly defined symbols or if it even does not clearly say what its name is,” Zaoralek said, according to the Czech News Agency.

When the decision does go through, Czechia will officially become the conventional short-form name for the country, while the Czech Republic will remain the conventional long-form name.

[Finnish was the second language of Sweden for centuries. Now Arabic is overtaking it.]

The Central European state had been unusual among European countries for not designating a short-form name when it was formed after the breakup of Czechoslovakia in 1993. The other half of that former nation, for example, has the long-form name of the Slovak Republic but is more commonly known by its short-form name, Slovakia. Other states follow a similar formula: Russia is the Russian Federation, Germany is the Federal Republic of Germany, and so on.

Finding a short-form name for the Czech Republic had proved difficult, however. In the Czech Republic itself, the short name “Cesko” is used. That name is said to date to the 18th century, though it came to official use only in the 20th century. Even today, it isn’t fully accepted: According to the Economist, former Czech president Vaclav Havel once said that the word made his “flesh creep.” Some suggested that the name was a reminder of the country’s split from Slovakia, though others said it just sounds nasty: The word is “short and harsh sounding,” one Czech cartographer told Radio Prague in 2004.

Despite the controversy, Cesko forms the basis of many of the short names for the Czech Republic in foreign languages – Tschechien in German, for example, or Tchéquie in French. Meanwhile, the English-language short name has not stuck. Historically, the country had been referred to as Bohemia in English, which translates as “Cechy” in Czech. This name was commonly used up to the 20th century by English-language newspapers. However, it technically refers only to one region of the modern country, and not the two others, Moravia and Silesia.

Taxes show ​Bernie Sanders gave 4 percent of income to charity in 2014

Taxes show ​Bernie Sanders gave 4 percent of income to charity in 2014

WASHINGTON –Bernie Sanders released his full 2014 federal tax return Friday, revealing that he mostly lives off a six-figure government salary and donated about 4 percent of his family’s income to charitable causes.

Sanders and his wife, Jane, donated $8,350 to charity while reporting an adjusted gross income of about $205,000 that year, according to his tax return. The share of his family’s income that went to charity was about half the percentage of income that his primary opponent, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, gave to charitable groups.

The Sanders campaign released the return a day after a heated Democratic presidential debate in which Sanders pledged to release the single return but hesitated to say when he would release additional years of his taxes.

Play VIDEO

Clinton and Sanders clash in feisty NYC debate

During Thursday night’s debate in Brooklyn, Clinton was asked if she would release transcripts of paid speeches she gave to Wall Street banks. Clinton argued that she is being held to a different standard than other candidates in the race — and that she’ll release the transcripts of her speeches when other candidates are just as transparent, hitting Sanders for not having released his tax returns.

"There are certain expectations when you run for president. This is a new one, and I’ve said that if everybody agrees to do it — because there are speeches for money on the other side, I know that," she said. "But I will tell you this, there is a long-standing expectation that everybody running release their tax returns, and you can go to my website and see eight years of tax returns and I’ve released 30 years of tax returns and I think every candidate, including Sen. Sanders and Donald Trump, should do the same.

Sanders then rebutted her, saying he would be more than happy to release his (nonexistent) transcripts from Wall Street speeches.

"You heard her, everybody else does it, she’ll do it, I will do it," he said, to applause. "I am going to release all of the transcripts of the speeches that I gave on Wall Street behind closed doors — not for $225,000, not for $2,000, not for two cents. There were no speeches."

Until Friday, Sanders had only released the summary of his 2014 tax returns. Clinton has released eight years of tax returns this cycle, with more years released when she was running for senate.

Play VIDEO

Clinton, Sanders battle over minimum wage, Wall Street and guns

Sanders said at the debate that he would release his 2015 taxes this week. Asked about the reason for the delay on his other years of tax returns — especially if they are as simple has he insists they are — Sanders said his wife, Jane Sanders, usually does the couple’s taxes and she has been "busy" with the campaign. It’s an answer he has given before.

"The answer is, you know, what we have always done in my family is Jane does them, and she’s been out on the campaign trail," he said. "We will get them out. We’ll get them out very shortly."

Sanders contrasted his modest wealth with Clinton’s multimillion-dollar income, a significant portion of which has come in the form of paid speeches to corporate and interest groups.

"I don’t want to get anybody very excited. They are very boring tax returns," Sanders said. "No big money from speeches, no major investments. Unfortunately, I remain one of the poorer members of the United States Senate. And that’s what that will show."

Sanders campaign didn’t immediately respond Friday evening to emailed questions seeking additional details about Sanders’ charitable giving.

Since 1976, every major party presidential nominee has released full tax returns. So far this year, though, Clinton is the only major-party presidential candidate who has released several years of full tax returns. GOP front-runner Donald Trump hasn’t released any of his returns, and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich have only released partial returns.

In 2014, the Clintons donated more than $3 million, nearly 11 percent of their income. Since 2000, the Clintons have given nearly $15 million to charity, tax returns show.

Boston marks 3 years after deadly marathon bombings

Boston marks 3 years after deadly marathon bombings

Boston marked the third anniversary of the deadly 2013 marathon bombings with subdued remembrances.

The governor and mayor joined victims’ families Friday morning for a brief and quiet ceremony at the finish line on Boylston Street.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker and his wife, Lauren, bowed their heads in silence after helping the father of one of the three who died, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, place a white flower wreath. Mayor Marty Walsh placed a second wreath with the families of the other slain victims, 8-year-old Martin Richard and 23-year-old Lingzi Lu.

No one spoke.

Related Image

FILE – This combination of undated family photos shows, from left, Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Campbell, 29, and Lingzi Lu, a Boston University graduate student from China. Richard, Campbell and Lu were killed in the bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/File)Expand / Contract

This combination of undated family photos shows, from left, Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Campbell, 29, and Lingzi Lu, 23. (AP Photo/File)

A bagpipe played softly before the occasion, which was observed by nearly 100 people including survivors, their families and supporters.

A multi-colored banner with a peace sign, a heart and words Martin Richard had written before his death — "no more hurting people … peace" — hung on an empty storefront.

Two men placed crosses on a tree honoring the victims, including MIT Police Officer Sean Collier, who was killed by the attackers in the ensuring manhunt.

Scott Weisberg, a 46-year-old Birmingham, Alabama, physician who finished the 2013 marathon seconds before the first bomb detonated, said he comes back each year for the anniversary and to run the race.

He wears hearing aids now because he suffered hearing loss and recently closed his medical practice because he continues to deal with memory loss and speech processing problems from head injuries he sustained in the blast.

"This is a special time to connect. I have a second family who understands what I’m going through," Weisberg said. "The first year, a lot of us were just trying to figure things out. I think the focus now for many of us is where we’re going, what we’re going to do with the second half of our lives."

Later in the day, Deval Patrick, the governor at the time of the attacks, is slated to speak at an interfaith service near the finish line.

At 2:49 p.m., a citywide moment of silence will mark the time when the first of two pressure cooker bombs detonated near the race’s end, killing three people and injuring over 260 others.

One of the bombers, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was sentenced to death in June. His brother, Tamerlan, died in a gunfight with police in the days after the attack.

Throughout the day, residents will be taking part in blood drives, food and clothing collections and other community service projects as the city has proclaimed April 15 "One Boston Day," a day to celebrate the city’s resilience through acts of kindness and generosity.

Martin Richard’s family, for example, is leading a cleanup in their Boston neighborhood of Dorchester while Lu’s family is making a financial donation to the Police Department’s Athletic League.

The mayor’s office is collecting premixed baby formula, baby wipes and hand sanitizer to send to Flint, the Michigan city struggling with lead-tainted drinking water.

Pope Makes Provocative Trip to Greece as EU Deports Migrants

Pope Makes Provocative Trip to Greece as EU Deports Migrants

LESBOS, Greece — Pope Francis is known for his symbolic gestures, but even by Franciscan standards, his visit to a Greek refugee detention center as the European Union implements a controversial deportation plan is as provocative as any he has undertaken.

Francis and the spiritual leader of the world’s Orthodox Christians will spend nearly an hour Saturday greeting some 250 refugees stuck on the Greek island of Lesbos. They will lunch with eight of them to hear their stories of fleeing war, conflict and poverty and hopes for a better life in Europe. And they will toss floral wreathes into the sea to pray for those who never made it.

It’s a gesture Francis first made when he visited the Italian island of Lampedusa in the summer of 2013, his first trip outside Rome as pope, after a dozen migrants died trying to reach the southern tip of Europe. He made a similar gesture more recently at the U.S.-Mexican border, laying a bouquet of flowers next to a large crucifix at the Ciudad Juarez border crossing in memory of migrants who died trying to reach the U.S.

"He is slightly provocative," said George Demacopoulos, chair of Orthodox Christian studies at the Jesuit-run Fordham University in New York. Citing Francis’ Mexico border visit in February, in the heat of a U.S. presidential campaign where illegal immigration took center stage, he added: "He is within his purview to do so, but that was a provocative move."

The Vatican insists Saturday’s visit is purely humanitarian and religious in nature, not political or a "direct" criticism of the EU plan.

But spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi told reporters that Francis’ position on Europe’s "moral obligation" to welcome refugees is well-known, and that the EU-Turkey deportation deal certainly has "consequences on the situation of the people involved."

The Vatican official in charge of migrants, Cardinal Antonio Maria Veglio, was even more explicit, saying the EU-Turkey plan essentially treats migrants as merchandise that can be traded back and forth and doesn’t recognize their inherent dignity as human beings.

The March 18 EU-Turkey deal stipulates that anyone arriving clandestinely on Greek islands on or after March 20 will be returned to Turkey unless they successfully apply for asylum in Greece. For every Syrian sent back, the EU will take another Syrian directly from Turkey for resettlement in Europe. In return, Turkey was granted concessions including billions of euros to deal with the more than 2.7 million Syrian refugees living there, and a speeding up of its stalled accession talks with the EU.

Human rights groups have denounced the deal as an abdication of Europe’s obligations to grant protection to asylum-seekers.

The son of Italian immigrants to Argentina, Francis has made the plight of refugees, the poor and downtrodden the focus of his ministry as pope, denouncing the "globalization of indifference" that the world shows the less fortunate.

Aside from the inherently political nature of the trip, it also has a significant religious dimension. Francis will be visiting alongside the spiritual leader of the world’s 300 million Orthodox Christians, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, and the head of the Orthodox Church of Greece, Athens Archbishop Ieronymos II.

Lombardi said the ecumenical significance of such a meeting was "obvious" — and he credited Greece’s politicians with their willingness to let the religious leaders take center stage as an "appreciated" gesture of discretion.

UK police arrest 5 in terror probe

UK police arrest 5 in terror probe

Police in Birmingham, England, said Friday they have arrested five terror suspects in a joint investigation involving UK intelligence and French and Belgian authorities.

The suspects — four men ranging in age from 26 to 59, and a 29-year-old woman, were arrested on suspicion of being involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of terrorist acts, West Midlands police said in a statement. Four were arrested in Birmingham, the fifth at London’s Gatwick Airport, police said.

"The arrests were preplanned and intelligence-led," Assistant Chief Constable Marcus Beale said in a statement. "There was no risk to the public at any time and there is no information to suggest an attack in the UK was being planned."

The arrests followed revelations that Mohamed Abrini — who investigators say has been linked to the terror March attacks in Brussels and the November 2015 attack in Paris — had traveled to Birmingham several times in the year before the Paris attacks.

‘Man in the hat’ identified in Brussels terror attacks

‘Man in the hat’ identified in Brussels terror attacks 02:18

Abrini is known as the "man in the hat" in surveillance video taken of bombers in the Brussels Airport attack. His DNA and fingerprints were lifted from a vehicle used in the Paris attacks, and surveillance video spotted him with Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam at a gas station between Brussels and the French capital.

A senior British counterterrorism source told CNN on Friday that investigators have determined he met with people suspected of terrorist activity and took several photos of landmarks in the Birmingham area, including a football stadium.

Shrunken Citigroup Illustrates a Trend in Big U

Shrunken Citigroup Illustrates a Trend in Big U.S. Banks

Citigroup became the nation’s first megabank some two decades ago by expanding into new businesses while pushing to knock down barriers that limited its size.

A much different Citigroup was evident on Friday as it reported its quarterly results. Business lines like subprime lending, which used to define the company, have all but disappeared.

Over the last seven years, Citigroup has sold more than 60 businesses, shedding retail bank branches from Boston to Pakistan. In all, the bank’s holdings have shrunk by $700 billion — an amount roughly equivalent to Switzerland’s economic output. The bank’s chief executive said on Friday that since he took over in 2012, the company’s work force had declined by 40,000 jobs, through layoffs or selling businesses.

On the campaign trail, and in the Democratic debate Thursday, the conversation has often returned to an assumption that very little has changed in the nation’s banking system since the 2008 financial crisis. But Citigroup’s financial results were one of many reminders this week of just how much success the government has already had in pushing banks to become simpler and safer, if not always smaller.

Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase, in their own earnings announcements this week, emphasized how much more of a financial cushion they had built up to protect themselves in a crisis, and how many risky businesses they had jettisoned.

The bank presentations this week also indicated that even if Senator Bernie Sanders, Democrat of Vermont, does not win the White House — and is thwarted in his wish to break up the big banks — the companies will still face intense pressure from their regulators and their shareholders to shed more employees and business lines.

On Thursday, Bank of America talked about the likelihood of further reductions, while Goldman Sachs is said to be embarking on its biggest cost-cutting campaign in years.

All of these moves are a testament to the power of the tools that the regulators have already used, and appear intent to continue using, to change the profile of the biggest American banks.

Rather than simply telling the banks to shrink, regulators have used a set of sometimes arcane instruments — like capital requirements — that have quietly but significantly penalized the banks for their size and complexity, and required them to find ways to shrink on their own.

Just this week, the top bank regulators wielded a relatively new tool when they told five of the eight largest banks that they needed to develop better plans for winding themselves down in case of a crisis. If the banks do not do so, the regulators threatened to force the banks to shrink even more.

Citigroup was the only one of the eight largest banks to have its plan, or so-called living will, approved by the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, in large part because of the steps the bank has already taken to slim down.

Like the other big banks, it is not yet out of the woods, however. Because of the regulatory penalties for being large, some on Wall Street are questioning whether even in its diminished state, Citigroup is still too large.

“You should be selling the silverware in the dining rooms or the paper clips from the desk or the desk chairs or the whole desk,” the banking analyst Mike Mayo told Citigroup’s top executives in a conference call Friday morning.

Mr. Mayo’s frustration is a response to the struggles of Citigroup and other banking giants to increase profits under the new regulatory burden they are facing. The results in the first quarter were among the weakest the big banks have reported since the financial crisis, as they struggled with a sluggish global economy and persistently low interest rates.

The challenges have pushed bank stocks down this year to their lowest level since 2012. That in turn, has forced bank executives to cut salaries and bonuses, and thousands of jobs, across their business lines.

Financial services nonetheless is still among the highest-paying sectors in the country. And more important, the big banks remain behemoths. JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo are bigger than they were before the financial crisis. At all the big banks, the risk-taking Wall Street operations still provide a major proportion of revenue and profit.

But all of that is being squeezed by the “vise that is the current regulatory environment,” said Brian Kleinhanzl, an analyst with Keefe Bruyette & Woods, an investment bank.

A keeper at the Palm Beach Zoo died Friday afternoon after being attacked by a rare species of tiger

A keeper at the Palm Beach Zoo died Friday afternoon after being attacked by a rare species of tiger, zoo spokeswoman Naki Carter said.

Stacey Konwiser, 38, lead tiger keeper at the zoo, was killed by a 13-year-old male Malayan tiger, one of four at the facility, in the contained area where the animals are fed and sleep, Carter said.

Zoo officials said it didn’t appear Konwiser did anything out of the norm as she worked in the enclosure, known as the tiger night house, and prepared to talk with zoo visitors about the animals in a "Tiger Talk."

The tiger was off-exhibit at the time and no guests could see what happened, Carter said. The tiger was never on the loose, contrary to early reports on social media, she said.

West Palm Beach police said the tiger was tranquilized and officers waited until the drugs took effect before they could reach the victim, CNN affiliate WPEC reported. Konwiser was taken by helicopter to St. Mary’s Medical Center.

Konwiser had worked three years at the zoo and was very experienced with tigers, Carter said. Her husband, Jeremy Konwiser, is also a trainer at the zoo.

"This was her specialty," she said. "She loved tigers. You don’t get into this business without the love for the animals and understanding the danger that’s involved even more."

Konwiser had a special bond with the big cats, Carter told the Palm Beach Post.

"I kind of referred to her as a tiger whisperer," she said. "They spoke to each other in a language that only they could understand. And I can’t put into words or make you understand for anyone who didn’t know Stacey how much she loved these tigers and how much this zoo family loved her. And while she’s no longer with us, her memory will live on."

Konwiser graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a bachelor’s degree in biology and received her master’s degree in conservation biology from the University of Queensland in Australia, the Palm Beach Zoo’s official Facebook page said.

Malayan tigers are a critically endangered species. The Palm Beach Zoo provides a special program in which guests can pay extra to see the tigers.

There are less than 250 left in the world, Carter said. The zoo is part of a breeding program that aims to keep the animals from becoming extinct. Carter would not comment about the condition of the tiger except to say it has been contained. The investigation is ongoing and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is taking over.

When the attack happened about 2 p.m., guests at the zoo were ushered into the gift shop before being told the zoo was closed for the day.

"This is my first time at the zoo," one zoo visitor, Beverly Johnson of Fort Pierce, told the Palm Beach Post. "I wasn’t expecting this."

The zoo was evacuated and will be closed through Saturday, Carter said.

‘They are trained to feel like that’s their territory’

Dave Salmoni, the large predator expert for Animal Planet, said he was not surprised such an attack happened in the tiger night house.

"Typically zoo cats, that’s where they feel most comfortable," Salmoni said on "Anderson Cooper 360." "They are trained to feel like that’s their territory. So when you talk about acts of aggression or acts of dominance, which this might have been either, that would be the most likely place for something like this."

Salmoni said people who work with big cats understand and accept the danger.

"It’s heartbreaking to hear about a story of someone who loves an animal so much," he said. "I can relate. The same thing could possibly happen to me tomorrow."

UK police arrest 5 in terror probe

UK police arrest 5 in terror probe

Police in Birmingham, England, said Friday they have arrested five terror suspects in a joint investigation involving UK intelligence and French and Belgian authorities.

The suspects — four men ranging in age from 26 to 59, and a 29-year-old woman, were arrested on suspicion of being involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of terrorist acts, West Midlands police said in a statement. Four were arrested in Birmingham, the fifth at London’s Gatwick Airport, police said.

"The arrests were preplanned and intelligence-led," Assistant Chief Constable Marcus Beale said in a statement. "There was no risk to the public at any time and there is no information to suggest an attack in the UK was being planned."

The arrests followed revelations that Mohamed Abrini — who investigators say has been linked to the terror March attacks in Brussels and the November 2015 attack in Paris — had traveled to Birmingham several times in the year before the Paris attacks.

‘Man in the hat’ identified in Brussels terror attacks

‘Man in the hat’ identified in Brussels terror attacks 02:18

Abrini is known as the "man in the hat" in surveillance video taken of bombers in the Brussels Airport attack. His DNA and fingerprints were lifted from a vehicle used in the Paris attacks, and surveillance video spotted him with Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam at a gas station between Brussels and the French capital.

A senior British counterterrorism source told CNN on Friday that investigators have determined he met with people suspected of terrorist activity and took several photos of landmarks in the Birmingham area, including a football stadium.

Taxes show ​Bernie Sanders gave 4 percent of income to charity in 2014

Taxes show ​Bernie Sanders gave 4 percent of income to charity in 2014

WASHINGTON –Bernie Sanders released his full 2014 federal tax return Friday, revealing that he mostly lives off a six-figure government salary and donated about 4 percent of his family’s income to charitable causes.

Sanders and his wife, Jane, donated $8,350 to charity while reporting an adjusted gross income of about $205,000 that year, according to his tax return. The share of his family’s income that went to charity was about half the percentage of income that his primary opponent, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, gave to charitable groups.

The Sanders campaign released the return a day after a heated Democratic presidential debate in which Sanders pledged to release the single return but hesitated to say when he would release additional years of his taxes.

Play VIDEO

Clinton and Sanders clash in feisty NYC debate

During Thursday night’s debate in Brooklyn, Clinton was asked if she would release transcripts of paid speeches she gave to Wall Street banks. Clinton argued that she is being held to a different standard than other candidates in the race — and that she’ll release the transcripts of her speeches when other candidates are just as transparent, hitting Sanders for not having released his tax returns.

"There are certain expectations when you run for president. This is a new one, and I’ve said that if everybody agrees to do it — because there are speeches for money on the other side, I know that," she said. "But I will tell you this, there is a long-standing expectation that everybody running release their tax returns, and you can go to my website and see eight years of tax returns and I’ve released 30 years of tax returns and I think every candidate, including Sen. Sanders and Donald Trump, should do the same.

Sanders then rebutted her, saying he would be more than happy to release his (nonexistent) transcripts from Wall Street speeches.

"You heard her, everybody else does it, she’ll do it, I will do it," he said, to applause. "I am going to release all of the transcripts of the speeches that I gave on Wall Street behind closed doors — not for $225,000, not for $2,000, not for two cents. There were no speeches."

Until Friday, Sanders had only released the summary of his 2014 tax returns. Clinton has released eight years of tax returns this cycle, with more years released when she was running for senate.

Play VIDEO

Clinton, Sanders battle over minimum wage, Wall Street and guns

Sanders said at the debate that he would release his 2015 taxes this week. Asked about the reason for the delay on his other years of tax returns — especially if they are as simple has he insists they are — Sanders said his wife, Jane Sanders, usually does the couple’s taxes and she has been "busy" with the campaign. It’s an answer he has given before.

"The answer is, you know, what we have always done in my family is Jane does them, and she’s been out on the campaign trail," he said. "We will get them out. We’ll get them out very shortly."

Sanders contrasted his modest wealth with Clinton’s multimillion-dollar income, a significant portion of which has come in the form of paid speeches to corporate and interest groups.

"I don’t want to get anybody very excited. They are very boring tax returns," Sanders said. "No big money from speeches, no major investments. Unfortunately, I remain one of the poorer members of the United States Senate. And that’s what that will show."

Sanders campaign didn’t immediately respond Friday evening to emailed questions seeking additional details about Sanders’ charitable giving.

Since 1976, every major party presidential nominee has released full tax returns. So far this year, though, Clinton is the only major-party presidential candidate who has released several years of full tax returns. GOP front-runner Donald Trump hasn’t released any of his returns, and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich have only released partial returns.

In 2014, the Clintons donated more than $3 million, nearly 11 percent of their income. Since 2000, the Clintons have given nearly $15 million to charity, tax returns show.

Boston marks 3 years after deadly marathon bombings

Boston marks 3 years after deadly marathon bombings

Boston marked the third anniversary of the deadly 2013 marathon bombings with subdued remembrances.

The governor and mayor joined victims’ families Friday morning for a brief and quiet ceremony at the finish line on Boylston Street.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker and his wife, Lauren, bowed their heads in silence after helping the father of one of the three who died, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, place a white flower wreath. Mayor Marty Walsh placed a second wreath with the families of the other slain victims, 8-year-old Martin Richard and 23-year-old Lingzi Lu.

No one spoke.

Related Image

FILE – This combination of undated family photos shows, from left, Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Campbell, 29, and Lingzi Lu, a Boston University graduate student from China. Richard, Campbell and Lu were killed in the bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/File)Expand / Contract

This combination of undated family photos shows, from left, Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Campbell, 29, and Lingzi Lu, 23. (AP Photo/File)

A bagpipe played softly before the occasion, which was observed by nearly 100 people including survivors, their families and supporters.

A multi-colored banner with a peace sign, a heart and words Martin Richard had written before his death — "no more hurting people … peace" — hung on an empty storefront.

Two men placed crosses on a tree honoring the victims, including MIT Police Officer Sean Collier, who was killed by the attackers in the ensuring manhunt.

Scott Weisberg, a 46-year-old Birmingham, Alabama, physician who finished the 2013 marathon seconds before the first bomb detonated, said he comes back each year for the anniversary and to run the race.

He wears hearing aids now because he suffered hearing loss and recently closed his medical practice because he continues to deal with memory loss and speech processing problems from head injuries he sustained in the blast.

"This is a special time to connect. I have a second family who understands what I’m going through," Weisberg said. "The first year, a lot of us were just trying to figure things out. I think the focus now for many of us is where we’re going, what we’re going to do with the second half of our lives."

Later in the day, Deval Patrick, the governor at the time of the attacks, is slated to speak at an interfaith service near the finish line.

At 2:49 p.m., a citywide moment of silence will mark the time when the first of two pressure cooker bombs detonated near the race’s end, killing three people and injuring over 260 others.

One of the bombers, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was sentenced to death in June. His brother, Tamerlan, died in a gunfight with police in the days after the attack.

Throughout the day, residents will be taking part in blood drives, food and clothing collections and other community service projects as the city has proclaimed April 15 "One Boston Day," a day to celebrate the city’s resilience through acts of kindness and generosity.

Martin Richard’s family, for example, is leading a cleanup in their Boston neighborhood of Dorchester while Lu’s family is making a financial donation to the Police Department’s Athletic League.

The mayor’s office is collecting premixed baby formula, baby wipes and hand sanitizer to send to Flint, the Michigan city struggling with lead-tainted drinking water.